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Meet “Casper” the newly-discovered octopus species

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This ghostlike octopod (right) is almost certainly an undescribed species and may not belong to any described genus. Nicknamed Casper for his resemblance to the cartoon character, only you can decide if you they appear to be separated at birth. Credit: NOAA. Original photo modified by Sherpa Multimedia.

By Scott A. Rowan

Ghosts surprise. That’s what they do.

So it only makes sense that the surprise scientists experienced days ago should result in a new species named after the cartoon character Casper the Friendly Ghost.

adv-TheSuperFins.com-shirtsOn February 27, officials with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration took the Okeanos Explorer for her first mission of 2016 into the waters northeast of Necker Island (Mokumanamana) and were pleasantly surprised to apparently make history on their first mission of the year. While seeking out rock and sediment samples at 14,074 feet (4,290, m), scientists were stunned to see a cephalopod that experts believe has never been previously recorded.

If the findings hold up to more thorough research over the coming months, NOAA’s discovery would be a record-setting depth for any incirrate octopods. Octopi that live deep in the ocean are separated into two categories: cirrate or incirrate. Cirrate octopods posses fingerlike cirri near their suckers along with fins on the sides of their bodies, which is why they are often referred to as “dumbo” octopods. Cirrate are known to live beyond 16,000 feet (5,000 m), while their close cousin incirrate octopods were never previously known to live deeper than 13,000 feet (4,000 m). (To remember the difference, think of the word cilia – another fingerlike structure widely found in the animal kingdom – when discussing cirri and the differences between the two groups should never be confusing.)

“The octopod imaged in detail on this first dive was a member of the second group, the incirrates,” Michael Vecchione explained in NOAA’s press release about the finding. “This animal was particularly unusual because it lacked the pigment cells, called chromatophores, typical of most cephalopods, and it did not seem very muscular. This resulted in a ghostlike appearance, leading to a comment on social media that it should be called Casper, like the friendly cartoon ghost. It is almost certainly an undescribed species and may not belong to any described genus.”

Casper has indeed become popular pretty quickly. Within days of NOAA’s announcement the world has already named the newly-discovered species “Casper” in news reports around the world. NOAA officials are still researching to learn if this recording was a first. Regardless of what they find, the success of Casper bodes well for the future of the Okeanos Explorer.

Though Necker Island is one of the smallest islands in the entire Hawaiian island archipelago, it has more than 385,000 acres of marine habitat surrounding it, making it the second largest marine habitat in one of the most biodiverse regions of the world. The island has more religious markers, statues, and permanent objects than it does residents because visitors are only permitted to conduct scientific research. Restricted access is enforced to preserve the habitats.
Though Necker Island is one of the smallest islands in the entire Hawaiian island archipelago, it has more than 385,000 acres of marine habitat surrounding it, making it the second largest marine habitat in one of the most biodiverse regions of the world. The island has more religious markers, statues, and permanent objects than it does residents because visitors are only permitted to conduct scientific research. Restricted access is enforced to preserve the habitats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCES:
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1603/logs/mar2/mar2.html

http://www.hawaiianatolls.org/about/mokumanamana.php

 
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